Your Voice, Your Story

We are working together to spread the word about prematurity and what it means to babies and their families.

What better way to do this than to share Your Story?

We would like to share it on our website for the world to see!

Please submit Your Story to: info@cpbf-fbpc.org

The Story of Titoluwa

TitoluwaFirst and foremost I want to thank the moderator for the opportunity given to me to share my story, our story from a perspective that probably has never been shared before.

I remembered sending a tweet few weeks ago, asking if we could share our story from another part of the world. I got a Yes! I came across this body when I was searching for information about other preemies and get to know how parents from other part of the globe fare with them and learn from them.

Let me be specific, may be not totally specific so that we will not be losing the importance of this incredible story that has made me believe that Preemies are special creatures in the plan of God. I will be sharing our story, my story from the African perspective. Yes Africa! I will exclude the specific country for now, because I think it is the same malaise that is plaguing most developing nations, except few of them in terms of advancement in medical facilities.

The Story of Taylor

TaylorJuly 3, 2002 started out as a normal day. We were living in Sudbury, Ontario as we relocated there from Kitchener, for my husband’s job. It was a warm, sunny day and our son Evan, who was 17months old, was playing in the kitchen and we were getting ready to carry on with our day.

Evan was a healthy boy, born ten days late by C-section, on January 20, 2001 and weighed 9lbs 6oz. On July 3, 2002 I was 28 weeks pregnant, enjoying another great pregnancy. We already knew that this new baby would be a scheduled C-section for the beginning of September. The doctors had estimated this baby was to be born much bigger then Evan, at least, if not more then, 10 pounds!

The Story of Vienna-Grace

Vienna-Grace with mom On July 1, 2013 the unthinkable happened. I woke up in a pool of blood with severe labour pains. I immediately went to labour and delivery at my local hospital.

After examination I was advised that I had bulging membranes and that I would be delivering this baby early and the chances of my baby surviving at 23+4 days in gestation was very slim.

The doctor made several calls and I was transferred Sunnybrook Hospital where they stopped the labour and gave me corticosteroid injections to help mature the baby’s lungs for delivery. I was admitted to the high risk unit and placed on strict bedrest where they monitored the baby very closely.

The waiting game was so traumatic and frightening; all I did was pray.

The Story of M & R

By their mother, Alana Romain

Alana Preemie Photo 2 The day my twins, M and R, were born was easily the best day of my life, but it was also the worst. I’d been pregnant for 25 weeks and 5 days, and along the way I’d watched as things went from bad, to worse, to this is a nightmare.

We discovered at a routine ultrasound at 21 weeks, that I had what was called a dynamic cervix, or a cervix with a fluctuating length. What I learned that day was that I would almost certainly not carry my twins to term, but I might at least have a shot at carrying to viability.

I was admitted to hospital three weeks later with threatened pre-term labour, and managed to stay pregnant for another week and one day.

Once labour had begun, we had a visit from the neonatologist, who asked whether we wanted the babies to be resuscitated after they were born. “Do everything,” we said. “Please do everything.”

The Story of Leo

leo pic1While on vacation in Savannah, Georgia, Leo was born nearly 8 weeks early at 32 weeks and 5 days on October 26, 2012 at 2:29 A.M. He weighed 3lbs. and 8oz and measured 15.7 inches. Despite being born early, Leo was in good condition.

A few days after birth he needed to receive treatment for jaundice which required two rounds of phototherapy over a week’s time where we could only hold him for an hour a day.

In addition to this, Leo needed time to develop in order to regulate his own body temperature and learn to coordinate his ability to breathe, suck, and swallow.

Leo was air transported from Savannah’s Memorial Hospital to St. Paul’s, Vancouver, at 18 days old, where he stayed another 15 days.

The Story of Cameron

Cameron was born at 28 weeks and spent almost 6 months in the NICU at The Montreal Children’s Hospital.

 

The Story of Amie, Ben and Cory

1 + 1 = 3??

We lost our first child at 23 weeks, but we were determined to try and have a biological child.

We became pregnant after 3 years of progressively aggressive fertility treatments. The 6-week U/S showed twins, the 9-week U/S showed triplets... how did that happen!?!?

The Pregnancy

The pregnancy was difficult. I was taken off work at 13 weeks due to cramping and bleeding. Insomnia and nausea added to an already stressful time. We prepared ourselves for another potential loss.

Every week gave us hope.

The Stolar Family

Asher & Talya’s NICU Journey

Twins, Asher and Talya came into this world 15 weeks early; they were only 25 week’s gestation; only 1 week into their third trimester. While we were scared, shocked, overwhelmed, we did have some warning signs that they would be delivered early – we just never thought that it would be this early! At 14 week gestation, I experienced Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes (PPROM) with Asher (twin B).

The Reeve Family

A Mother’s Miracle

My pregnancy started like anyone else’s. The worst feeling I had was like a constant hangover. It was nothing compared to some women have to go through. I thought I was getting off lucky. In a few months I had started to feel the baby move, “This is real, my baby is moving!” Little did I know this was BOTH my babies moving. I was having twins! I was shocked, they were so rare in my family, how could I have TWINS!! Could I handle it? Was I ready? Why was I having twins??? I would find out the answer to these questions soon enough.

The Mostowy Family

Eli was born at 25 weeks weighing 1 lb 7 oz. I was devastated, as I’ve never heard a baby born this young and survive. During his NICU stay, we were constantly told he may not survive. His doctor never gave us any positive report for the first few months. We were always wondering if he will be able to fight all this. He was septic, he had pneumonia twice, a nurse accidentaly cut his finger, he developed ROP, unexplained high blood pressure, and he lost his voice due to being intubated for almost 3 months. He came home on oxygen and he just came off it a few days ago.

The Martens Family

Ok, so here is Jacobs’ story … There are many views, there’s my emotional new mom view, there’s our view of the time as a family and then there is the view on the medical implications that resulted in our extended stay…. I am already lost and anxious to begin writing, as re-living any part of this time in our lives, is like willingly re-living your worst nightmare. This period of time does not define our son, myself nor our relationships, it’s the worst of the worst for us.

Michelle Ryan, MD

I started medical school three months pregnant with my second child. Within two months, at 24 weeks and 5 days’ gestation, my membranes ruptured and I went into labour. A decision had to be made quickly about whether to proceed with a classical Caesarean section, potentially compromising my future ability to carry to term, and be aggressive with the medical care in an attempt to save our infant who, we were told, only had a 30% chance of survival. My husband and I reasoned we had this baby now, so we asked that aggressive measures be taken. Within the hour, our little Josiah was born – all 750 g of him.

Joyce’s Story: Life inside (and outside) the incubator

By: Josefa Chan and Joyce Chan

June 2014

From Josefa (Mom):

Joyce in incubator

As a mother of two preemies, I want to share my experiences with parents who are facing what I had gone through almost 21 years ago. My hope is that the story of my children may encourage them while they are facing difficult situations.